And Then the Credits Roll…

Do you sit through all the credits? Most fans of Fantasy/SciFi films do. This is particularly true of the films in the Marvel Comic Universe (MCU). Most of the films have a teaser, a cliffhanger, or introduce a character that will star in the next film. I like a little heads up from reviewers and friends if there’s a good reason to sit through a credit sequence. My particular favorite was a quick flash of the Avengers hanging out eating sandwiches; not a plot twist, just a fun moment of the Super Heroes relaxing. I have friends who won’t go see Spiderman: Far From Home because they haven’t seen Avengers Endgame. This newest, Jon Watts-directed Spiderman film happens AFTER the sequence of events in the Endgame film. So can you see this film if you missed the other film and should you wait for the last credit to roll?

First, you CAN see Spiderman: Far From Home if you haven’t seen Avengers Endgame but only if you at least know the general plot line of that film. If you’ve stayed away from reviews, don’t ever listen to teenagers talking and/or you live remotely with no WiFi–okay, maybe wait to see the re-release of that last film. It’s just eclipsed Avatar in dollars made at the box office (not counting Gone With The Wind). So you have your chance…

Second, stay for the mid-credit sequence if you’re a big fan of Spiderman films and for the second reveal at the very end if you like plot-twists and surprises. If you’re like me, wondering why the studio needs to keep reinventing this character…you can skip the wait. I enjoyed this version and find Tom Holland charming and Zendaya’s sarcastic take on Mary Jane refreshing. I’m also a fan of Jake Gyllenhaal, Jon Favreau, and Marisa Tomei, so I enjoyed seeing them on screen. The young actors who play the sweethearts of the film are a delight. And any film that wants to portray the Dutch as lovely people is A-OK in my book.

Was the plot silly? The action sequences too long? Did the characters act in ways that made little sense save to advance the plot? Well, of course! It’s a 2-hour film crammed with visits to other countries so that the “heroes” can wreak havoc to some recognizable landmarks. The excuses for there being no other Avengers available to help this teenage boy fight an International-World-Threatening-Villain are as lame as the chaperones sent on this high school trip. Yet if you endured the 3-hour Avengers Endgame and the dark, dark plots of that film and the one before it…this will be a relief. A light comic romp with some well-drawn characters. Not as enjoyable as the animated Into the Spiderverse, or half as clever…but a good bet that the MCU is back to having a little fun.

Drinks with Films Review: 3 cups of tea (out of 5), a tip of the hat to the London Bridge

“Chef”–cooking up a few misconceptions?

Two films that I didn’t get around to watching till recently, both featured Twitter.  One film, Frank, featuring Micheal Fassibinder in a plaster of paris head (why would you cover that man’s gorgeous head?), used Twitter as a way for the least-talented band member to create a buzz and a following for the band.  Chef,  written and directed by the lovable Jon Favreau, uses it as a central plot device.  The Chef loses his job over a tweet that he assumes is private but instead goes viral.  The social media tool is used to build a connection between father and son and Twitter also magically drums up business for their new food truck.  I say, magically, because the young son played realistically by Emjay Anthony, manages to create a fan base, send out map coordinates for where the food truck is traveling and posts professional photos all while the young man is learning to be a cook!  It’s an interesting time when the last three movies I’ve seen, all feature social media prominently in their story lines.

Chef is a lovely fairy tale of film.  A work-obsessed man loses his job and must learn to love his son and reinvent himself.  Hardly ground-breaking but setting the action on a food truck and featuring some wonderful actors that aren’t frequently given good roles makes for an enjoyable ride!  John LeguizamoBobby CannavaleSofía Vergara and Oliver Platt all give wonderful performances and it’s fun to see Dustin Hoffman in a juicy part.  My issue with the film is that it is a fairy tale.  Money magically appears to finance the venture, one character quits his job after just being promoted so he can make sandwiches with the chef and love blossoms when you follow your heart.

A friend, and divorce coach, had some good advice to families that might watch this film together.  Mandy Walker writes about Wish Fulfillment in children from separated parents.  And hopefully, anyone who loses their job won’t think that transforming your life doesn’t generally end with an enemy with a pocket-full of cash offering to make your dreams come true…

And can someone tell me what role Amy Sedaris played?  I sure missed her!

Rating: 4 beers, but don’t share them with your son

Bechdel Rating: passes